smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularlyhow do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

(via wilwheaton)

In my seventeen years as a bookseller and three years as a school librarian before that, if there’s one thing I have noticed, it’s that we adults make all kinds of erroneous assumptions about what will and won’t interest children. Time and time again, at the bookstore and at children’s book festivals, I have observed white children picking up books with kids of color on the cover, and heard adults express surprise at the choice. “Are you sure you want that one?” they’ll ask. Or, “Wouldn’t you like this book instead?” It’s not the kids who are the problem. Kids really, really, really only care about a great story. In twenty years of connecting children with books they love, I have only seen one child—ONE!—balk at a book cover because the main character was a different race from her own. It’s the adults who underestimate a child’s ability or desire to see beyond race.

The good news is that those same adults will usually respond well to bookseller enthusiasm for titles and allow their own reservations (which they aren’t even consciously aware of) to be shifted.

Great advice from Elizabeth Bluemle, co-owner of the Flying Pig Bookstore in Shelburne, VT. For more great advice on how to book-talk diverse titles to customers and patrons (this applies to libraries, too!), see the full article: True or False? Multicultural Books Don’t Sell (We Are the Problem, We Are the Solution). (via tubooks)

(via elloellenoh)

vegandragon:

We used to be best buddies,
But now we’re not.
I wish you would tell me why…

vegandragon:

We used to be best buddies,

But now we’re not.

I wish you would tell me why…

(via shakesperianwaffle)

xwinging:

fuzzleyan:

so basically someone made a redesigned version of Comic Sans and holy I never knew I could warm up to something that resembles Comic Sans like this

I’m not a typographer so my eyes aren’t trained for this but I think I might use this from now on

oh my god its like comic sans grew up

pilgrimkitty:

unbucaneve:

jenesaispourquoi:

professorsparklepants:

Why does everyone say “house-wife” or “house-husband” when “House-spouse” is not only gender neutral, but also RHYMES?

the prof asks the important questions.

Wait, spouse rhymes with house? I always pronounced it ‘spooze’ in my head /o\ WHY IS YOUR LANGUAGE SO WEIRD!!!

Because English beats up other languages in dark alleys, then rifles through their pockets for loose grammar and spare vocabulary.

(via themamafox)

tedx:

Watch the whole talk here»

John Dehlin is a practicing Mormon … and an outspoken activist for LGBTQ rights. In this touching talk at TEDxUSU, John shares how a friendship with an openly gay coworker changed his views on homosexuality and led him to a career in psychology.

In his research, John looks at the complex, often-prickly relationship between religion and sexuality. Here, he shares some of his findings — heartbreaking statistics about how negative feelings toward sexuality and attempts to “fix” same-sex attraction inspire suicides and teen homelessness.

(via themamafox)

akio:

I have to say that the single most important lesson I learned in 25 years talking every single day to people was that there is a common denominator in our human experience. Most of us, I tell ya, we don’t want to be divided. What we want—the common denominator that I found in every single interview—is that we want to be validated. We want to be understood.

I’ve done over 35,000 interviews in my career, and as soon as that camera shuts off everyone always turns to me and inevitably in their own way ask this question: “was that ok?”

I heard it from President Bush. I heard it from President Obama. I’ve heard it from heroes and from housewives. I’ve heard it from victims and perpetrators of crime. I even heard it from BE-YON-CÉ in all of her Beyoncé-ness. She finishes performing, hands me the microphone, and says “was that ok?” [x]

(via elloellenoh)

bookoisseur:

THE CUTEST

(Source: idolizingidina, via geekyjessica)

randomredux:

"Brozen," "Bronies," what it all means is "I am so insecure about what I like that I MUST rebrand it as masculine before associating with it."

(via carry-on-my-wayward-butt)

evererika:

deepinmyb0nes:

iamprogress:

"I think every woman at one point or another in their life has been called a bitch. For a long time I had a real problem with that word, I didn’t like it and I thought it was derogatory. But I’ve gotten to a place now where I’ve made a lot of peace with it. It’s been so overused and made to seem so derogatory towards woman that I’ve adapted it into an empowering feeling for myself. If I’m a bitch then I’m a bitch, if that’s what an assertive woman is to you. So I’ve sort of adapted it as a badge of honor."

TTTHHHIIISSSSS

A+

(Source: therealxtina, via carry-on-my-wayward-butt)

Writer. Storyteller. Filmmaker. Geek.
Social media junkie. Prone to awesomeness.
My name is pronounced like banana. Unless you're English.